initial commit
[fcgi] / doc / fcgi-java.htm
1 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
2 <HTML>
3    <HEAD>
4       <TITLE>
5          Integrating FastCGI with Java
6       </TITLE>
7 <STYLE TYPE="text/css">
8  body {
9   background-color: #FFFFFF;
10   color: #000000;
11  }
12  :link { color: #cc0000 }
13  :visited { color: #555555 }
14  :active { color: #000011 }
15  dt.c4 {font-style: italic}
16  h5.c3 {text-align: center}
17  p.c2 {text-align: center}
18  div.c1 {text-align: center}
19 </STYLE>
20    </HEAD>
21    <BODY>
22       <DIV CLASS="c1">
23          <A HREF="http://fastcgi.com"><IMG BORDER="0" SRC="../images/fcgi-hd.gif" ALT="[[FastCGI]]"></A>
24       </DIV>
25       <BR CLEAR="all">
26       <DIV CLASS="c1">
27          <H3>
28             Integrating FastCGI with Java
29          </H3>
30       </DIV>
31       <!--Copyright (c) 1996 Open Market, Inc.                                    -->
32       <!--See the file "LICENSE.TERMS" for information on usage and redistribution-->
33       <!--of this file, and for a DISCLAIMER OF ALL WARRANTIES.                   -->
34       <!-- $Id: fcgi-java.htm,v 1.4 2002/02/25 00:42:59 robs Exp $ -->
35       <P CLASS="c2">
36          Steve Harris<BR>
37          Open Market, Inc.<BR>
38          <EM>7 May 1996</EM>
39       </P>
40       <H5 CLASS="c3">
41          Copyright &copy; 1996 Open Market, Inc. 245 First Street, Cambridge, MA 02142 U.S.A.<BR>
42          Tel: 617-621-9500 Fax: 617-621-1703 URL: <A HREF=
43          "http://www.openmarket.com/">http://www.openmarket.com/</A><BR>
44       </H5>
45       <HR>
46       <H3>
47          <A NAME="S1">1. Introduction</A>
48       </H3>
49       <P>
50          Java is an object-oriented programming language developed by Sun Microsystems. The Java Depvelopers Kit (JDK),
51          which contains the basic Java class packages, is available from Sun in both source and binary forms at
52          Sun&#39;s <A HREF="http://java.sun.com/java.sun.com/JDK-1.0/index.html">JavaSoft</A> site. This document
53          assumes that you have some familiarity with the basics of compiling and running Java programs.
54       </P>
55       <P>
56          There are two kinds of applications built using Java.
57       </P>
58       <UL>
59          <LI>
60             <I>Java Applets</I> are graphical components which are run off HTML pages via the <TT>&lt;APPLET&gt;</TT>
61             HTML extention tag.<BR>
62             <BR>
63          </LI>
64          <LI>
65             <I>Java Applications (Apps)</I> are stand-alone programs that are run by invoking the Java interpreter
66             directly. Like C programs, they have a <TT>main()</TT> method which the interpreter uses as an entry point.
67          </LI>
68       </UL>
69       <P>
70          The initial emphasis on using Java for client side applets should not obscure the fact that Java is a full
71          strength programming language which can be used to develop server side stand alone applications, including CGI
72          and now FastCGI applications.
73       </P>
74       <P>
75          The remainder of this document explains how to write and run FastCGI Java applications. It also illustrates
76          the conversion of a sample Java CGI program to a FastCGI program.
77       </P>
78       <H3>
79          <A NAME="S2">2. Writing FastCGI applications in Java</A>
80       </H3>
81       <P>
82          Writing a FastCGI application in Java is as simple as writing one in C.
83       </P>
84       <OL>
85          <LI>
86             Import the <TT>FCGIInterface</TT> class.
87          </LI>
88          <LI>
89             Perform one-time initialization at the top of the <TT>main()</TT> method.
90          </LI>
91          <LI>
92             Create a new <TT>FCGIInterface</TT> object and send it an <TT>FCGIaccept()</TT> message in a loop.
93          </LI>
94          <LI>
95             Put the per-request application code inside that loop.
96          </LI>
97       </OL>
98       <P>
99          On return from <TT>FCGIaccept()</TT> you can access the request&#39;s environment variables using
100          <TT>System.getProperty</TT> and perform request-related I/O through the standard variables <TT>System.in</TT>,
101          <TT>System.out</TT>, and <TT>System.err</TT>.
102       </P>
103       <P>
104          To illustrate these points, the kit includes <TT>examples/TinyCGI</TT>, a CGI Java application, and
105          <TT>examples/TinyFCGI</TT>, the FastCGI version of TinyCGI. These programs perform the same functions as the C
106          programs <TT>examples/tiny-cgi.c</TT> and <TT>examples/tiny-fcgi.c</TT> that are used as examples in the <A
107          HREF="fcgi-devel-kit.htm#S3.1.1">FastCGI Developer&#39;s Kit document</A>.
108       </P>
109       <H4>
110          A. TinyCGI
111       </H4>
112 <PRE>
113  
114 class TinyCGI { 
115  public static void main (String args[]) {  
116   int count = 0;
117                 ++count;
118   System.out.println(&quot;Content-type: text/html\n\n&quot;);
119   System.out.println(&quot;&lt;html&gt;&quot;);
120   System.out.println(
121                  &quot;&lt;head&gt;&lt;TITLE&gt;CGI Hello&lt;/TITLE&gt;&lt;/head&gt;&quot;);
122   System.out.println(&quot;&lt;body&gt;&quot;);
123   System.out.println(&quot;&lt;H3&gt;CGI-Hello&lt;/H3&gt;&quot;);
124   System.out.println(&quot;request number &quot; + count + 
125      &quot; running on host &quot; 
126     + System.getProperty&lt;&quot;SERVER_NAME&quot;));
127   System.out.println(&quot;&lt;/body&gt;&quot;);
128   System.out.println(&quot;&lt;/html&gt;&quot;); 
129   }
130  }
131
132 </PRE>
133       <H4>
134          B. TinyFCGI
135       </H4>
136 <PRE>
137  
138 import FCGIInterface;
139
140 class TinyFCGI { 
141  public static void main (String args[]) {  
142   int count = 0;
143    while(new FCGIInterface().FCGIaccept()&gt;= 0) {
144    count ++;
145    System.out.println(&quot;Content-type: text/html\n\n&quot;);
146    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;html&gt;&quot;);
147    System.out.println(
148      &quot;&lt;head&gt;&lt;TITLE&gt;FastCGI-Hello Java stdio&lt;/TITLE&gt;&lt;/head&gt;&quot;);
149    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;body&gt;&quot;);
150    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;H3&gt;FastCGI-HelloJava stdio&lt;/H3&gt;&quot;);
151    System.out.println(&quot;request number &quot; + count + 
152      &quot; running on host &quot; 
153     + System.getProperty&lt;&quot;SERVER_NAME&quot;));
154    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;/body&gt;&quot;);
155    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;/html&gt;&quot;); 
156    }
157   }
158  }
159
160 </PRE>
161       <H4>
162          C. Running these Examples
163       </H4>
164       <P>
165          We assume that you have downloaded the JDK and the FastCGI Developer&#39;s Kit, and that you have a Web server
166          running that can access the <TT>fcgi-devel-kit/examples</TT> directory. In all cases where we specify paths,
167          we are using relative paths within <TT>fcgi-devel-kit</TT> or the JDK which will need to be enlarged to a full
168          path by the user.
169       </P>
170       <H5>
171          Configuring
172       </H5>
173       <OL>
174          <LI>
175             Add your JDK&#39;s <TT>java/bin</TT> directory to your Unix <TT>PATH</TT> if it isn&#39;t there
176             already.<BR>
177             <BR>
178          </LI>
179          <LI>
180             Add the directories <TT>fcgi-devel-kit/examples</TT> and <TT>fcgi-devel-kit/java/classes</TT> to your Java
181             <TT>CLASSPATH</TT>.<BR>
182             <BR>
183          </LI>
184          <LI>
185             In your Open Market Secure WebServer configuration file, <TT>httpd.config</TT>, add the following two
186             lines:<BR>
187             <BR>
188              <TT>ExternalAppClass TinyFCGI -host</TT> <I>hostName:portNum</I><BR>
189              <TT>Responder TinyFCGI fcgi-devel-kit/examples/TinyFCGI</TT><BR>
190             <BR>
191              
192             <UL>
193                <LI>
194                   <I>hostName</I> is the name of your host machine.<BR>
195                </LI>
196                <LI>
197                   <I>portNum</I> is the port that you&#39;ve selected for communication between the Web server and the
198                   Java application.<BR>
199                </LI>
200             </UL>
201             <BR>
202              On other servers you can use <TT>cgi-fcgi</TT> to get a similar effect.
203          </LI>
204          <LI>
205             Create a soft link <TT>examples/javexe</TT> to the <TT>java/bin</TT> directory in your JDK. This link is
206             required only to run the CGI scripts <TT>examples/TinyCGI.cgi</TT> and <TT>examples/TinyFCGI.cgi</TT>,
207             which use it to invoke the Java interpreter <TT>java/bin/java</TT>. It is not used by FastCGI applications.
208          </LI>
209          <LI>
210             You might have to modify <TT>examples/TinyFCGI.cgi</TT> to use a Unix shell for which your CLASSPATH is
211             defined.
212          </LI>
213       </OL>
214       <H5>
215          Running
216       </H5>
217       <UL>
218          <LI>
219             To run TinyFCGI as FastCGI, you invoke the Java interpreter with the -D option, giving it the
220             <TT>FCGI_PORT</TT> environment variable and the same <I>portNum</I> that was used in the Web server
221             configuration. The command is:<BR>
222             <BR>
223              <TT>java -DFCGI_PORT=portNum TinyFCGI</TT><BR>
224             <BR>
225              Then point your browser at <TT>fcgi-devel-kit/examples/TinyFCGI</TT>. Notice that each time you reload,
226             the count increments.<BR>
227             <BR>
228          </LI>
229          <LI>
230             To run TinyCGI, point your browser at <TT>fcgi-devel-kit/examples/TinyCGI.cgi</TT> on your host machine.
231             Notice that the count does not increment.<BR>
232             <BR>
233          </LI>
234          <LI>
235             Finally, you can run TinyFCGI as a straight CGI program by pointing your browser at
236             <TT>fcgi-devel-kit/examplesi/TinyFCGI.cgi.</TT> The results are exactly the same as when you ran TinyCGI.
237             Invoking a FastCGI program without an <TT>FCGI_PORT</TT> parameter tells the FastCGI interface to leave the
238             normal CGI environment in place.
239          </LI>
240       </UL>
241       <P>
242          Due to gaps in the Java interpreter&#39;s support for listening sockets, Java FastCGI applications are
243          currently limited to being started as external applications. They can&#39;t be started and managed by the Web
244          server because they are incapable of using a listening socket that the Web server creates.
245       </P>
246       <H3>
247          <A NAME="S3">3. Standard I/O and Application Libraries</A>
248       </H3>
249       <P>
250          As we have seen above, FastCGI for Java offers a redefinition of standard I/O corresponding to the the
251          <I>fcgi_stdio</I> functionality. It also offers a set of directly callable I/O methods corresponding to the
252          <I>fcgiapp</I> C library. To understand where these methods occur we need to look briefly at the FastCGI
253          redefinition of standard I/O.
254       </P>
255       <P>
256          Java defines standard I/O in the <I>java.System</I> class as follows:
257       </P>
258       <P>
259          public static InputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(new FileInputStream(FileDescriptor.in), 128);<BR>
260          public static PrintStream out = new PrintStream(new BufferedOutputStream(new
261          FileOutputStream(FileDescriptor.out), 128), true);<BR>
262          public static PrintStream err = new PrintStream(new BufferedOutputStream(new
263          FileOutputStream(FileDescriptor.err), 128), true);
264       </P>
265       <P>
266          The File Descriptors <I>in</I>, <I>out</I>, <I>err</I> are constants set to 0, 1 and 2 respectively.
267       </P>
268       <P>
269          The FastCGI interface redefines <I>java.System in, out</I>, and <I>err</I> by replacing the File streams with
270          Socket streams and inserting streams which know how to manage the FastCGI protocol between the Socket streams
271          and the Buffered streams in the above definitions.
272       </P>
273       <P>
274          For those cases where the FCGI application needs to bypass the standard I/O streams, it can directly access
275          the methods of the FCGI input and output streams which roughly correspond to the functions in the C
276          <I>fcgiapp</I> library. These streams can be accessed via the <I>request</I> class variable in FCGIInterface.
277          Each Request object has instance variables that refer to an FCGIInputStream, and to two FCGIOutputStreams
278          associated with that request.
279       </P>
280       <H3>
281          <A NAME="S4">4. Environment Variables</A>
282       </H3>
283       <P>
284          Java does not use the C <I>environ</I> list. Nor is there a <I>getenv</I> command that reads system
285          environment variables. This is intentional for reasons of portability and security. Java has an internal
286          dictionary of properties which belongs to the System class. These System properties are <I>name/value</I>
287          associations that constitute the Java environment. When a Java application starts up, it reads in a file with
288          default properties. As we have seen, additional System properties may be inserted by using the -D <I>Java</I>
289          command argument.
290       </P>
291       <P>
292          For CGI, where the Java application is invoked from a .cgi script that, in turn, invokes the Java interpreter,
293          this script could read the environment and pass the variables to the Java application either by writing a file
294          or by creating -D options on the fly. Both of these methods are somewhat awkward.
295       </P>
296       <P>
297          For FastCGI Java applications, the environment variables are obtained from the FastCGI web server via
298          <TT>FCGI_PARAMS</TT> records that are sent to the application at the start of each request. The FastCGI
299          interface stores the original startup properties, combines these with the properties obtained from the server,
300          and puts the new set of properties in the System properties dictionary. The only parameter that has to be
301          specifically added at startup time is the FCGI_PORT parameter for the Socket creation. In the future, we
302          expect that even this parameter won&#39;t be needed, since its use is due to an acknowledged rigidity in the
303          JDK&#39;s implementation of sockets.
304       </P>
305       <P>
306       </P>
307       <H3>
308          <A NAME="S4">5. Further examples: EchoFCGI and Echo2FCGI</A>
309       </H3>
310       <P>
311          The next two examples illustrate the points made in the last two sections. EchoFCGI and Echo2FCGI both echo
312          user input and display the application&#39;s environment variables. EchoFCGI reads the user input from
313          System.in, while Echo2FCGI reads the user input directly from the intermediate FastCGI input stream.
314       </P>
315       <H4>
316          A. EchoFCGI
317       </H4>
318 <PRE>
319 import FCGIInterface;
320 import FCGIGlobalDefs;
321 import java.io.*;
322
323 class EchoFCGI {
324  
325  public static void main (String args[]) {
326   int status = 0;
327    while(new FCGIInterface().FCGIaccept()&gt;= 0) {
328   System.out.println(&quot;Content-type: text/html\n\n&quot;);
329    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;html&gt;&quot;);
330    System.out.println(
331     &quot;&lt;head%gt;&lt;TITLE&gt;FastCGI echo
332                                       &lt;/TITLE&gt;&lt;/head&gt;&quot;);
333    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;body&gt;&quot;); 
334    System.out.println(
335                                          &quot;&lt;H2&gt;FastCGI echo&lt;/H2&gt;&quot;);
336    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;H3&gt;STDIN&lt;/H3&gt;&quot;);
337    for ( int c = 0; c != -1; ) {
338     try {
339      c = System.in.read();
340     } catch(IOException e) {
341      System.out.println(
342      &quot;&lt;br&gt;&lt;b&gt;SYSTEM EXCEPTION&quot;);
343      Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
344      rt.exit(status);
345      }
346     if (c != -1) { 
347      System.out.print((char)c);
348      }
349     }
350    System.out.println(
351     &quot;&lt;H3&gt;Environment Variables:&lt;/H3&gt;&quot;);
352  
353    System.getProperties().list(System.out);
354    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;/body&gt;&quot;);
355    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;/html&gt;&quot;);
356       }
357   }
358    }
359 </PRE>
360       <H4>
361          B. Echo2FCGI
362       </H4>
363 <PRE>
364 import FCGIInterface;
365 import FCGIGlobalDefs;
366 import FCGIInputStream;
367 import FCGIOutputStream;
368 import FCGIMessage;
369 import FCGIRequest;
370 import java.io.*;
371
372 class Echo2FCGI {
373
374  public static void main (String args[]) {
375   int status = 0;
376                 FCGIInterface intf = new FCGIInterface();
377    while(intf.FCGIaccept()&gt;= 0) {
378   System.out.println(&quot;Content-type: text/html\n\n&quot;);
379    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;html&gt;&quot;);
380    System.out.println(
381     &quot;&lt;head&gt;&lt;TITLE&gt;FastCGI echo
382                                     &lt;/TITLE&gt;&lt;/head&gt;&quot;);
383    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;body&gt;&quot;);   
384    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;H2&gt;FastCGI echo&lt;/H2&gt;&quot;);
385    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;H3&gt;STDIN:&lt;/H3&quot;&gt;);
386    for ( int c = 0; c != -1; ) {
387     try {
388      c = intf.request.inStream.read();
389     } catch(IOException e) {
390      System.out.println(
391      &quot;&lt;br&gt;&lt;b&gt;SYSTEM EXCEPTION&quot;);
392      Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
393      rt.exit(status);
394      }
395     if (c != -1) { 
396      System.out.print((char)c);
397      }
398     }
399    System.out.println(
400     &quot;&lt;H3&gt;Environment Variables:&lt;/H3&gt;&quot;);
401  
402    System.getProperties().list(System.out);
403    System.out.println(&lt;&quot;/body&gt;&quot;);
404    System.out.println(&quot;&lt;/html&gt;&quot;);
405       }
406   }
407    }
408 </PRE>
409       <H4>
410          C. Running these Examples
411       </H4>
412       <H5>
413          Configuring
414       </H5>
415       <P>
416          As with TinyFCGI, you need to configure the web server to recognize these two FastCGI applications. Your
417          configuration now looks like this:
418       </P>
419       <P>
420       </P>
421 <PRE>
422 ExternalAppClass java1 -host hostname:portNum
423 Responder java1 fcgi-devel-kit/examples/TinyFCGI
424 ExternalAppClass java2 -host hostname:portNumA
425 Responder java2 fcgi-devel-kit/examples/EchoFCGI
426 ExternalAppClass java3 -host hostname:porNumB
427 Responder java3 fcgi-devel-kit/examples/Echo2FCGI
428 </PRE>
429       <P>
430          Note that the application classes and port numbers are different for each application.
431       </P>
432       <H5>
433          Running
434       </H5>
435       <P>
436          As with TinyFCGI, you need to run these programs with the -D option using FCGI_PORT and the appropriate port
437          number. To get some data for standard input we have created two html pages with forms that use a POST method.
438          These are echo.html and echo2.html. You must edit these .html files to expand the path to
439          <I>fcgi-devel-kit/examples</I> to a full path. Once the appropriate Java program is running, point your
440          browser at the corresponding HTML page, enter some data and select the <I>go_find</I> button.
441       </P>
442       <H3>
443          <A NAME="S6">6. FastCGI Java Classes</A>
444       </H3>
445       <P>
446          The Java FastCGI classes are included in both source and byte code format in <I>fcgi-devel-kit/java/src</I>
447          and :<I>fcgi-devel-kit/java/classes</I> respectively. The following is a brief description of these classes:
448       </P>
449       <P>
450       </P>
451       <DL>
452          <DT CLASS="c4">
453             FCGIInterface
454          </DT>
455          <DD>
456             This class contains the FCGIaccept method called by the FastCGI user application. This method sets up the
457             appropriate FastCGI environment for communication with the web server and manages FastCGI requests.<BR>
458          </DD>
459          <DT CLASS="c4">
460             FCGIInputStream
461          </DT>
462          <DD>
463             This input stream manages FastCGI internal buffers to ensure that the user gets all of the FastCGI messages
464             associated with a request. It uses FCGIMessage objects to interpret these incoming messages.<BR>
465          </DD>
466          <DT CLASS="c4">
467             FCGIOutputStream
468          </DT>
469          <DD>
470             This output stream manages FastCGI internal buffers to send user data back to the web server and to notify
471             the server of various FCGI protocol conditions. It uses FCGIMessage objects to format outgoing FastCGI
472             messages.<BR>
473          </DD>
474          <DT CLASS="c4">
475             FCGIMessage
476          </DT>
477          <DD>
478             This is the only class that understands the actual structure of the FastCGI messages. It interprets
479             incoming FastCGI records and constructs outgoing ones..<BR>
480          </DD>
481          <DT CLASS="c4">
482             FCGIRequest
483          </DT>
484          <DD>
485             This class currently contains data fields used by FastCGI to manage user requests. In a multi-threaded
486             version of FastCGI, the role of this class will be expanded.<BR>
487          </DD>
488          <DT CLASS="c4">
489             FCGIGlobalDefs
490          </DT>
491          <DD>
492             This class contains definitions of FastCGI constants.
493          </DD>
494       </DL>
495       <HR>
496       <ADDRESS>
497          <A HREF="mailto:harris@openmarket.com">Steve Harris // harris@openmarket.com</A>
498       </ADDRESS>
499    </BODY>
500 </HTML>
501